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Harvard referencing style

Harvard referencing style

Versions of Harvard differ between universities.  This guide is a recommended format for use at AUT.

  • If you use EndNote you may want to add the Harvard_AUT style.
  • Right click on the file below
  • Save to your styles folder C:\Program Files (x86)\EndNote X9\Styles or C:\Program Files (x86)\EndNote 20\Styles
  • Open EndNote and check you have the Harvard_AUT style in 'Select another style'

About Harvard Referencing

The "Harvard System" has no official institutional connection with Harvard University. It's another name for the author/date citation system, the custom of using author and date in parentheses, e.g. (Robbins 1987) to refer readers to the full bibliographic citations in appended bibliographies.  Some Harvard faculty were among the first practitioners in the late 19th century, and the name stuck, particularly in England and the Commonwealth countries.

Why you should reference properly

Academic integrity

Academic integrity involves the acknowledgement (referencing) of other peoples’ written work, images, audio files, or their ideas that you have used in your work. You also need to acknowledge any content you found on the internet, or other sources. The only content which you do not need acknowledge is common knowledge.

Plagiarism

When you use someone else's ideas or words in your writing without acknowledging (referencing) where they came from, it can be considered plagiarism or academic dishonesty.